O. & something pointless

oooswampwitch:

sleepmurder:

psychedelic-physicist:

Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer (Father of the atomic bomb)

Truly the face of a haunted man.

Possibly the most poignant sound byte ever.

jesus christ. this is chilling as hell. my dad told me he had said this, but it’s so different looking at this man and listening to him reflect upon the value and consequences of his actions.

(Source: imagineatoms)


amordragon:

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.
Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, a truly extraordinary woman.

amordragon:

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin, a truly extraordinary woman.


oldenough2burmom:

A photo from the Stonewall riots of 1969 — which the President referred to during his inaugural address. It is hard to believe now, but until the mid-1970s, police routinely raided gay and lesbian bars. It was a crime to kiss or dance with a member of the same sex. Very often, bars had warning lights to alert patrons of impending police raids. I have met lesbians who are now quite old and who remember the bad old days. One woman told me that women and men would dance with each other, with the idea being to try to rub close enough to the persons they really wanted for dance partners.
Oh, and the beating and rape of the prisoners removed forcibly from these bars and forced into police wagons was not uncommon.
Not to mention that such an arrest, if the name appeared in the newspaper, often led to a man or woman losing his/her job.
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oldenough2burmom:

A photo from the Stonewall riots of 1969 — which the President referred to during his inaugural address. It is hard to believe now, but until the mid-1970s, police routinely raided gay and lesbian bars. It was a crime to kiss or dance with a member of the same sex. Very often, bars had warning lights to alert patrons of impending police raids. I have met lesbians who are now quite old and who remember the bad old days. One woman told me that women and men would dance with each other, with the idea being to try to rub close enough to the persons they really wanted for dance partners.

Oh, and the beating and rape of the prisoners removed forcibly from these bars and forced into police wagons was not uncommon.

Not to mention that such an arrest, if the name appeared in the newspaper, often led to a man or woman losing his/her job.


jasoncwoodson:

Aleksander Mikhailovich Rodchenko (RussianАлекса́ндр Миха́йлович Ро́дченко; 5 December [O.S. 23 November] 1891 – December 3, 1956) was a Russian artistsculptorphotographer and graphic designer. He was one of the founders of constructivism and Russiandesign; he was married to the artist Varvara Stepanova.

Rodchenko was one of the most versatile Constructivist and Productivist artists to emerge after the Russian Revolution. He worked as a painter and graphic designer before turning to photomontage and photography. His photography was socially engaged, formally innovative, and opposed to a painterly aesthetic. Concerned with the need for analytical-documentary photo series, he often shot his subjects from odd angles—usually high above or down below—to shock the viewer and to postpone recognition. He wrote: “One has to take several different shots of a subject, from different points of view and in different situations, as if one examined it in the round rather than looked through the same key-hole again and again.” - Wikipedia